Gen scissors can be used to alter DNA.
© Colourbox.com
13.10.2016 in Science, Context

Context: CRISPR/Cas9 gene scissors

Gene scissors derived from bacterial “CRISPR/Cas” systems are considered to be a revolutionary discovery in the field of biosciences. It has never been easier to modify the genetic material of plants, animals or humans. Dr Johannes Stuttmann from the Institute of Biology explains the technique as well as its advantages and disadvantages. Read more

In addition to city books, such as the “Hallische Kämmereibuch” 1451 – 1541 (in the background), historians also find notices like the “Gesatzte belonunge der widder kauff briue Anno etc. Decimo” – an “ordinance on the level of interest on loans” from 1510 which was probably publicly displayed on or in the town hall.
© Maike Glöckner
29.09.2016 in Research, Science

The memory of a city

How did the people of a Medieval city organise their living? How did the council rule? How did they punish environmental offenses? These and much more information can be found in the laws, protocols and letters of the administration. Since the 13th century those things were written down in city books. A team, headed by historian Professor Andreas Ranft and Dr Christian Speer, can finally make these books accessible to research thanks to funding from the German Research Foundation (DFG). Read more

From historical manuscripts to digital databases: Stephan Feller (left) and Stefan Artmann sit down for a chat in the ULB’s Hungarian Library.
© Michael Deutsch
07.04.2016 in Featured, Miscellaneous, Research, Science

Making science freely available: Open access publishing

The open access movement began 15 years ago. Prof. Stephan Feller, a molecular biologist, and Dr. Stefan Artmann, a private lecturer in philosophy, discuss how it will change science in 2016 and the opportunities and challenges that will arise as a result of its development into an open exchange of specialist publications. It is a topic that occupies both men. Feller is the editor-in-chief and co-founder of the Open Access Journal “Cell Communication and Signalling”. Artmann, who heads up the presidential office at the Leopoldina, is a member of the working group “Open Access”, part of the priority initiative “Digital Information” of the Alliance of Science Organisations in Germany. Read more

Professor Ingrid Mertig at the Weinberg Campus
© Michael Deutsch
30.03.2016 in People, Science

“Success means having scientific insight”

If it wasn’t for Professor Ingrid Mertig, Nobel laureate Albert Fert would not be visiting the Weinberg Campus as often as he does. And perhaps Humboldt Professor Stuart Parkin wouldn’t have decided to come to the University. Mertig has been teaching and conducting research at Martin Luther University for the past 15 years as a professor of quantum theory of the solid state. Here she has built up the key research area “nanostructured materials”, which she has decisively shaped over the years as the spokesperson for the collaborative research centre (CRC) “Functionality of Oxidic Interfaces”. Read more

“I am only interested in animals, insects and microorganisms if they affect my plants” – Tiffany Knight in one of the greenhouses of the Botanical Garden in Halle
© Markus Scholz
24.03.2016 in People, Science

Fascinated by plants

Humboldt Professor Tiffany Knight studies the changes of ecosystems over long periods of time and the effects that a loss of biodiversity may have on the ecosystem. In February 2016, the affiliation of the renowned US-scientist changed from the Midwestern US to Central Germany. She is now working at the German Center of Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig. Read more

Dr. Manja Hussner, Head of International Office
© privat
16.02.2016 in Study and Teaching, Miscellaneous, Research, Campus, Science

University strengthens links with China

2015 has been a busy year for relations between China and Halle. The first Chinese language teacher provided by the Confucius Institute in Beijing has been working at the University of Halle since this April. In May, the University of Halle and the Beijing University of International Business and Economics sealed a partnership. And through the Panda Programme, the University of Halle was represented at the largest education fairs in China. Read more

The World Health Organisation says that changing eating habits and adopting a healthier lifestyle could stop the diseases developing in 80 percent of cases.
© Anna Karwowska / lia
09.12.2015 in Research, Science

“nutriCARD” aims to make food healthier

Pizzas, sweets and crisps – we all know that these kinds of food are unhealthy, but we still don’t want to give them up. That is why, rather than focusing on changing our eating habits, researchers from the universities of Halle, Jena and Leipzig have come together in the “nutriCARD” competence cluster to try and make food healthier. By doing so, they hope to prevent cardiovascular diseases in the long term. Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of death in Europe, but the World Health Organisation says that changing eating habits and adopting a healthier lifestyle could stop the diseases developing in 80 percent of cases. Read more

Potsherds of an age up to 2,500 years
© Tom Leonhardt
30.09.2015 in Research, Science

Robust clay: Chemist from Halle University finds glass needles in thousand-year-old ceramics from Brazil

5000 years ago the Brazilian natives mixed their clay with additional materials for improvement of the resistance and durability of their pottery. An important role played microscopically small glass needles of freshwater tree sponges, which was detected by an international team of researchers led by Dr. Filipe Natalio of the Institute of Chemistry at Halle University. Read more

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