Plant scientist Marcel Quint in the greenhouse - he specialises in studying the evolution of plants.
© Maike Glöckner
20.03.2020 in Science, Research

A genomic journey through time

New genetic studies paint a surprising picture of plant evolution: When plants came ashore around 500 million years ago, their genetic diversity exploded - thus laying the groundwork for genetic innovation that would only later prove important. Read more

Thomas Hahn (left) and Felix Marske in the laboratory. They are working on a new latent heat storage that is currently available in a cylindrical form.
© Markus Scholz mit Ingo Bartussek/stock.adobe.com
27.02.2020 in Science, Research

Heat accumulators of the future

Saving energy will play a crucial role in protecting the climate, and this could be achieved by the new heat storage systems for buildings that are currently being researched at the Institute of Chemistry. The results have already impressed at the Hugo Junkers Awards. Read more

Archaeologist François Bertemes in the institute’s repository
© Maike Glöckner
21.10.2019 in Featured, Science, Research

Early networks

For eight years, Professor François Bertemes coordinated research on the context of Nebra Sky Disc. The discovery of the disc has prompted archaeologists to completely rethink their notions about life in the Early Bronze Age. Read more

Dietrich H. Nies – here in the lab with Lucy Bütof – has been researching a gold-forming bacterium for years.
© Maike Glöckner
17.10.2019 in Featured, Science, Research

The tiny philosopher’s stone

The bacterium C. metallidurans is most notable for its perseverance, thriving in areas contaminated with heavy metals. It has attracted the attention of a research group in Halle, led by Professor Dietrich H. Nies, but for an entirely different reason: it produces microscopic gold nuggets. Read more

Jan Laufer and Ulrike Pohle use modern technology to obtain high-resolution images of blood vessel networks.
© Michael Deutsch
30.07.2019 in Science, Research

How blood cells grow

Medical physicists Professor Jan Laufer and Ulrike Pohle are working on a world first: a photoacoustic microscope with an optical ultrasound sensor that makes it possible to display high-resolution images of blood vessel networks. Their goal is to closely monitor and understand their growth. Read more

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